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No better period can be found for examining the press of Toronto than in the 1870s by which time the list of publications was long, the types varied, and experiment common.

 
The churches were active in publications relating wholly or in part to religion. The doyen was the Christian Guardian, organ of the Wesleyan Methodists since 1829 and made famous by Egerton Ryerson who was editor for three periods. The Methodist Book Room also brought out the monthly Canadian Methodist Magazine. From 1857 to 1884 the Primitive Methodists published the Christian Journal, a weekly which carried general news and claimed to be not ‘intensely denominational’.

 

The Presbyterians had a weekly, the Canadian Presbyterian, and the Baptists the Canadian Baptist. The division in the Church of England between high and low church was shown in the fact that for twenty-five years before they merged the Dominion Churchman was paralleled by the Evangelical Churchman.
Sunday school papers and improving home reading such as Golden Hours for the Young and Pleasant Hours were numerous and often short-lived.

 

On a subject that deeply concerned some of the churches and all in some way was the Canada Temperance Advocate.

 
…from the Story of Toronto by G. P. deT. Glazebrook pub. 1971

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Rev. Wadsworth of Montreal. spoke to the Kingston. Temperance Society in the Methodist Church on Wellington St. British Whig Feb. 19, 1848 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Rev. William  Case is general superintendent. Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 21, 1833 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Nelson G. Reynolds, the son of John Reynolds, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was arrested and brought from Belleville to jail in Kingston; he was one of the arrests in connection with the rebellion. British Whig Jan. 6, 1838 p. 2, col. 2, 5

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Nelson G. Reynolds, the son of John Reynolds, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was arrested and brought from Belleville to jail in Kingston; he was one of the arrests in connection with the rebellion. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Dec. 30, 1837 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Rev. W. Wilson of the Episcopal Methodist Church and others have been arrested in the Brockville area. British Whig Dec. 29, 1837 p. 1, col. 4-6

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Rev. W. Wilson of the Episcopal Methodist Church and others have been arrested in the Brockville area. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Dec. 27, 1837 p. 2, col. 6

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Rev. Thomas Baker is re-involved with the Union Church and will preach at the Episcopal Methodist Chapel on Rear Street. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Dec. 16, 1837 p. 2, col. 6

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Extensive report on the Belleville Chapel case. It came before the Midland District. Assizes; the plaintiffs were John Reynolds and others, Episcopal Methodists, and the defendants were Billa Flint and others of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. The jury decided in favour of John Reynolds and the Episcopal Methodists. The case is to be appealed. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 11, 1837 p. 2, col. 3, 4

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Notice by Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada: This body lost ownership of the Belleville Chapel to the Episcopal Methodist Church. British Whig Oct. 7, 1837 p. 3, col. 5

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Craig, artist Toronto, designed and coloured glass in window of Episcopal Church in Toronto. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Nov. 8, 1834 p. 2, col. 2

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Report on the “Waterloo Chapel Suit”. It was noted that Judge Robinson felt that the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada was the same body as the Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada. The other two judges felt that the property belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada but not to the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. The British Wesleyan Methodists are associated with and are part of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. An appeal to the crown is to be made. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 22, 1837 p. 1, col. 6

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Reference to controversy over church property between this group and the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. British Whig Feb. 21, 1837 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church:   British Wesleyan Methodists to appeal to crown re decision in favour of Episcopal Methodist Church concerning church lands. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 18, 1837 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Their church property was not vested in the British Wesleyan Church when the two recently united (1833) to form the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Judge John B. Robinson favoured the British Wesleyan Church in the settlement but Judges James B. Macaualy and Levies P. Sherwood voted against the British Wesleyan Methodists. British Whig Feb. 16, 1837 p. 3, col. 4, 5

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Their church property was not vested in the British Wesleyan Church when the two recently united (1833) to form the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Judge John B. Robinson favoured the British Wesleyan Church in the settlement but Judges James B. Macaualy and Levies P. Sherwood voted against the British Wesleyan Methodists. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 11, 1837 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Episcopal Church:   According to a report by E.J. Barker, Belleville is the headquarters of the Methodist Episcopal Church. British Whig Nov. 10, 1836 p. 3, col. 4

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Letter by Ephraim Evans of the Wesleyan Methodists concerning the Waterloo Chapel property dispute between that group and the Methodist Episcopal Church. British Whig Sept. 15, 1836 p. 1, col. 5

Methodist Episcopal Church:   This church sued the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada for title to the Waterloo Chapel, and won. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 14, 1836 p. 2, col. 4

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Rev. James Powley and Rev. John Bailey went to a conference of United States Methodists in Cincinnatti. British Whig Aug. 4, 1836 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Episcopal Church:   N.G. Reynolds son of Episcopal Methodist John Reynolds, to run as reform candidate in Hastings County. British Whig Apr. 14, 1836 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Episcopal Church:   In the correspondence of ex-governor Colborne it is noted that he referred to a meeting held by Mackenzie in the Methodist Episcopal Chapel, Brockville.  Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 27, 1836 p. 1, col. 6

Methodist Episcopal Church:   John Grass states that he is still an Episcopal Methodist although Rev. Whitney tried to persuade him to join the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Grass was read out of the Waterloo congregation. British Whig Feb. 5, 1835 p. 2, col. 4

Methodist Episcopal Church:   In response for a request for clarification from Egerton Ryerson of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, Robert S. Jameson stated that the aforementioned group has a claim on the property of the Methodist Episcopal Church, even though some members of the latter group remained separate. Jameson said that ministers expelled or withdrawn from the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada can no longer perform legal wedding ceremonies. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 31, 1835 p. 3, col. 5

Methodist Episcopal Church:    Excerpt from the Christian Guardian concerning the chapel property dispute between the Episcopals and the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Egerton Ryerson does not believe that the Episcopals have the right to perform marriages. British Whig Oct. 31, 1834 p. 2, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church:   John Cartwright denies that he had been abusing the Methodist. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Apr. 19, 1834 p. 2, col. 2, 3

Methodist Episcopal Church:   John James accused J.S. Cartwright of saying in 1832 that Methodist preachers neither ?feared God, man, nor the devil nor honoured the King.” British Whig Apr. 18, 1834 p. 2, col. 4

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Temperence meeting held at Ernestown in the Methodist Church. British Whig May 4, 1834 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Kingston Chronicle and Gazette comments on the Christian Guardian’s editorial policy under Egerton Ryerson. Implies that union between British Wesleyan and Episcopal Methodists is not final. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 8, 1834 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada:   Letter from an Episcopal Methodist opposing union of the two groups of Methodists. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 19, 1833 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Resolutions of the English Wesleyan conference re: union of the two groups. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 19, 1833 p. 2, col. 6

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Union of this church and the British Wesleyan Methodists. Egerton Ryerson of the Episcopals and George Marsden of the British Wesleyans supported union but some of the latter group did not. The reporter stated that the Episcopals are too closely connected with the American Methodist groups. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 12, 1833 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Article from the New York Commercial Advertiser re. Peter Jones, an Indian who was sent to England by the Methodist Church in 1831 to obtain aid for Indian missions in Upper Canada. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 21, 1833 p. 1, col. 1, 2

Methodist Episcopal Church: Rev. J. Stimson, representative of the Wesleyan Missionary Committee to Upper Canada, arrived in New York from Liverpool. Egerton Ryerson, representative of the Canadians to the British Conference, also arrived. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 14, 1833 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Rev. George Marsden of  London, representative of the British to the Methodist Conference in Upper Canada, arrived at New York Harbour from Liverpool. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 14, 1833 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Episcopal Church:   Kingston Chronicle comment on Mr. Ryan’s address to the Methodist Episcopal Church. Kingston Chronicle Nov. 21, 1829 p. 2, col. 5
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Rev. Lorenzo Dow, commonly called Crazy Dow will preach at the Methodist Episcopal Chapel in Kingston. Kingston Chronicle June 18, 1829 p. 2, col. 3
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Reference was made of Methodists. Kingston Chronicle Jan. 26, 1827 p. 3, col. 3-4
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Petition of the Episcopal Methodists in the Upper Canada Parliament. Kingston Chronicle May 1, 1822 p. 1, col. 4-5; p. 2, col. 1-3
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Episcopal Methodists present a petition to the Upper Canada Parliament. Kingston Chronicle Jan. 4, 1822 p. 1, col. 3-5; p. 2, col. 3-5; p. 3, col. 1-2
Methodist Episcopal Church:   A petition of the Episcopal Methodists presented to the Upper Canada-Parliament. Kingston Chronicle Jan. 18, 1822 p. 1, col. 3-5; p. 2, col. 1-5; p. 3, col. 1
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Robertt Jeffers withdraws from the Methodist Episcopal Church of America. Kingston Chronicle Aug. 24, 1821 p. 2, col. 5
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Letter to the editor from David Breakenridge re: the letter by the men who had withdrawn from the church. Kingston Gazette June 16, 1818 p. 3, col. 4
Methodist Episcopal Church:   Announcement from Robert Perry Jr., Daniel Picket and Daniel Perry to members of the church that they have withdrawn from the jurisdiction of that of the church in the United States and give their reasons for doing so. Kingston Gazette May 19, 1818 p. 3, col. 3, 4

Methodist Canada Conference:   Expresses thanks to Lt. Gov.  Colborne for his aid to Indian missions. Address presented by Rev. James Richardson, Rev. J.  Stinson, and Rev. J. Ryerson. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 12, 1834 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Canada Conference:   Rev. Grinrod, President of Methodist Canada Conference and Mr. Alder, Secretary of Wesleyan Missionary Society to preach in New York. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 5, 1834 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Canada Conference Resolutions drawn up at Methodist Conference re:  Christian Guardian’s editorial tone. Will print proceedings of Upper Canada Parliament. Will avoid having Methodist Church identified with a party. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 7, 1834 p. 1, col. 6

Methodist Canada Conference Rev. William Case, address on their behalf to Lt. Gov. Colborne and his reply on the spread of religion in Upper Canada. Kingston Chronicle Dec. 6, 1828 p. 2, col. 1-2

Methodist Chapel:   Notice re: building the chapel. Land purchased from Mr. R. Richardson, situated near the North Gate. Any further donations to be paid to Neil McLeod, of Kinston or William Denn, Point Frederick, two of the appointed Trustees. Proposals to be received by Thomas Catterick at Messres. Torrance and McLeod. Kingston Gazette Nov. 23, 1816 p. 3, col. 5 weekly to Kgtn. Gaz., Dec. 7, 1816 1816, p. 2, col. 2

Notices:

Methodist Chapel:    Notice from W. Smith, secretary, re. the meeting of the inhabitants of Hallowell on the Methodist Chapel. Kingston Chronicle May 7, 1829 p. 3, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:    Sermon to be preached by the Rev. John Stinson for the benefit of the Wesleyan Sabbath School. Kingston Chronicle Nov. 10, 1826 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:    Rev. Robert Alder, to preach at the Wesleyan Chapel next Sunday. Kingston Chronicle Sept. 22, 1826 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Missionary sermon by Rev. J. Stinson at the Wesleyan Chapel. Rev. R. Alder unable to attend. Kingston Chronicle Sept. 22, 1826 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Missionary sermons by Rev. Robert Alder, of Montreal. Reference to Christopher A. Hagerman and a collection in aid of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. Kingston Chronicle Sept. 1, 1826 p. 2, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. Mr. Stinson, Wesleyan Missionary, to perform Divine Service in the Wesleyan Chapel. Kingston Chronicle Aug. 4, 1826 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Notice from the Wesleyan Sabbath School. Kingston Chronicle May 18, 1825 p. 3, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:    The south half of Lot 282, situated nearly opposite the Methodist Wesleyan Chapel to be sold by auction, John Strange auctioneer. Kingston Chronicle Nov. 26, 1824 p. 3, col. 3 weekly to Dec. 10, 1824 p. 4, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Thanked by Rev. Thaddeus Osgood for bringing Sunday School children to a meeting. Kingston Chronicle Nov. 5, 1824 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   The Friends to Sunday Schools note that the church has a Sunday School. Kingston Chronicle Nov. 5, 1824 p. 3, col. 1-2

Methodist Chapel:   Thos. Underhill. To let: house north of the Chapel. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 6, 1821 p. 3, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   Vandals destroy the windows of the Chapel. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 6, 1821 p. 1, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   Upper Canada Parliament discussion on connections with the Americans. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 6, 1821, sup supp. p. 1, 2; p. 2, col. 1-4

Methodist Chapel:   The stone house north of the chapel is to let. Kingston Chronicle May 30, 1821 p. 4, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   Maj. Corbett and Wm. Mitchell of Kingston, wish to let a house above the Chapel, at present occupied by Mr. Underhill. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 7, 1820 p. 3, col. 4

Methodist Chapel:   Neil McLeod gives the Kingston Compassionate Society a donation from this chapel. Kingston Chronicle Feb. 18, 1820 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. Mr. Radcliffe to give a charity sermon in the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel for the Kingston Compassionate Society. Kingston Chronicle Feb. 11, 1820 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Union Sunday School Society to, be held at the Lancastrian School and at the Wesleyan Methodist Church. Kingston Gazette Nov. 3, 1818 p. 2, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Three sermons to be preached by Rev. James Booth, British missionary from Montreal, Rev. Robert McDowall, Ernestown. Publication of the financial state of the Chapel. Kingston Gazette Oct. 14, 1817 p. 3, col. 4

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. Smart is unable to fulfill appointment here. Kingston Gazette Sept. 3o, 1817 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. Smart to deliver a discourse here. Kingston Gazette Sept. 23, 1817 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   James Torrance dies. Donations made to the chapel. Kingston Gazette Sept. 16, 1817 p. 3, col. 4

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. R. McDowall to give 2 discourses in the chapel. Kingston Gazette Aug. 26, 1817 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   List of subscriptions for the British Methodist Society, and an outline of the contract for the Wesleyan Chapel. Kingston Gazette May 24, 1817 p. 3, col. 4-5

Methodist Chapel:  Rev. John G. Manly to preach sermon to Kingston Young Men’s Society at the Methodist Chapel. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 21, 1837 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. William M. Harvard is to preach at the Methodist Chapel in Rear St. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 15, 1837 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Sermon to be preached in large Wesleyan chapel by Rev. Peter Jones and Rev. William Howard, President of the Upper Canada Wesleyan Conference. Missionary meeting to be held by Rev. Harvard, Stinson, and Jones. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 14, 1837 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Wesleyan Sunday school students were examined. Noted that some students there enrolled receive no other education. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 7, 1835 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. William Lord is to preach in the Methodist Chapel on Rear St. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Nov. 15, 1834 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   H. Mayo can board some men in his house on Rear Street near the Methodist Chapel. British Whig Jun. 3, 1831 p. 2, col. 5 and twice weekly to June 1, 1834 p. 5, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Letter re. tea meeting here. Present were Lachlan Taylor, Rev. Bevitt, Rev. Gemley, and Rev. Carroll. Chronicle and Gazette May 31, 1845 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. M. Bayne explained the reasons for the secession of the new Free Church of Scotland in Hamilton from the Church of Scotland connection at the Wesleyan Chapel, John St., Hamilton. Chronicle and Gazette May 21, 1845 p. 2, col. 6

Methodist Chapel:   Rev. Thomas Scott was ordained in the Methodist Chapel, Simcoe. Chronicle and Gazette June 19, 1844 p. 2, col. 6

Methodist Chapel:   Sermon to be preached by Rev. William Ryerson and Rev. Egerton Ryerson here. Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 17, 1844 p. 3, col. 3

Methodist Chapel:   Tea meeting for the benefit of the Kingston Dorcas Society held in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada in this chapel, on Wellington and Johnson Streets. Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 17, 1844 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Sermon on behalf og the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society to be held here in the east end of town. Tea mtg. also to be held, organized by Mr. Geo Bilton with music by the 14th. Reg. Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 6, 1844 p. 2, col. 7

Methodist Chapel:   Mr. Fairman to give lecture here on ancient Jerusalem. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 9, 1842 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   Address to be delivered on Dec. 24, 1839 at 7: 00 p.m., in. the Methodist Chapel by Rev. Anson Green – subject of address – Temperance. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Dec. 24, 1839 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Joseph John Gurney addressed Society of Friends there. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 18, 1839 p. 2, col. 5

Methodist Chapel:   Joseph John Gurney, a member of the Society of Friends scheduled to come from Norwich, England to preach in Methodist Chapel, U.C. on Sept. 15. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Sept. 14, 1839 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   The anniversary of the Kingston Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society is to be held at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Addresses by Rev. Joseph Stinson,  Rev. William M. Harvard,  Rev. Peter Jones, and a native Indian missionary. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 16, 1839 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Thomas Jackson, a “coloured” member of the African Episcopal Methodist Church in the United States, is to preach in the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Rear St. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 5, 1837 p. 3, col. 3
Methodist Chapel:   Monthly sermon of the Kingston Young Men’s Society to be preached by the Reverend Mr. Ryerson at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Rear St. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette May 3, 1834 p. 3, col. 1

Methodist Chapel:   5th Anniversary of the Kingston Auxiliary to the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society of London at the Methodist Chapel. Col. Stone of Gananoque, chairman. Resolutions and committee members published. Kingston Chronicle Oct. 15, 1831 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   Mrs. Turner wife of Rev. Thomas Turner, Wesleyan Missionary, birth of a daughter. Kingston Chronicle Feb. 6, 1830 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist Chapel:   W. Saunders, of Hallowell, author of a letter to the editor in reply to a letter in the Upper Canada Herald from W. Smith, a Methodist Preacher, re. Rev. Henry Ryan. Kingston Chronicle June 6, 1829 p. 3, col. 5-6

Methodist Chapel:    The Ghost of John Wesley, author of a letter to the editor of the Brockville Gazette re. the Methodist Church in Upper Canada. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 19, 1829 p. 1, col. 2-5

Methodist Meeting House:   To let: stone house near the Methodist Meeting House, occupied by Lt. Mainwaring. Kingston Chronicle May 3, 1822 p. 1, col. 4

Methodist:    Letter to Chronicle and Gazette agreeing with sentiments expressed by the Reverend Robert D. Cartwright re shipping in and out of Kingston on the sabbath. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Apr. 12, 1834 p. 3, col. 2

Methodist:   Truth, author of a letter to the editor in reply to a letter from “A Methodist” in the Upper Canada Herald on the church controversy. Kingston Chronicle June 28, 1826 p. 2, col. 4-5

Methodist:    Letter on misbehaviour of Kingston Youths in the churches. Kingston Chronicle May 10, 1820 p. 3, col. 2-3

Methodist:   Editorial in reference to a Methodists letter on misbehaviour in the churches. Kingston Chronicle May 10, 1820 p. 3, col. 4

Merchants:   Mr. Bently, H. Hardy, and J.M. Rorison are selling a pamphlet by Rev. John G. Manly; The nature, origin, progress, present state, and character of Wesleyan Methodist. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette May 21, 1840 p. 2, col. 2

Methodists:   Anniversary of the Kgtn. branch of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. Rev. Matthew Richey, preach in the churches on Wellington St. and Bay St. Rev. T. Berritt and Rev. W. Squires will also preach. British Whig Feb. 12, 1848 p. 2, col. 5

Methodists:   Billa Flint, described as a Methodist, defeated Edw. Murney in Hastings County. British Whig Jan. 1, 1848 p. 2, col. 6

Methodists Article:  The Methodists and the college question.” Petition to Can. parl’t from the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, signed by Rev. Mathew Richey and George Rivers Sanderson. British Whig Dec. 11, 1847 p. 2, col. 3

Methodists:   Rev. Robert  Cooney to preach in the British Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 15, 1845 p. 3, col. 2

Methodists:    Rev. Matthew Richey and Rev. E.H Ryerson, attended a mtg. of the Free Church of Scotland held in Kgtn. at the Br. Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Chronicle and Gazette Apr. 20, 1844 p. 2, col. 5

Methodists:    Daniel Perry, a Methodist local preacher, died aged 65. Chronicle and Gazette Apr. 10, 1844 p. 3, col. 3

Methodists:   The Christian Guardian (Methodist) states that the next mtg. of the Presbyterian Church will be crucial. Chronicle and Gazette May 2, 1844 p. 3, col. 1

Methodists:   Article in the Christian Guardian by Egerton Ryerson re. Wm. H. Draper’s speech on King’s College. Egerton Ryerson notes that 2 yrs. ago he proposed to the editor of the Church a cessation of all controversy between the Church of Eng. and the Methodist Church. Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 24, 1844 p. 1, col. 3-7, p. 2, col. 1-3

Methodists:   Sermon on behalf of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Soc. to be held in the Methodist Chapel the act end of town. Tea mtg. also to be held organized by Mr. Gen. Bilton, with music by the 14th Reg. Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 6, 1844 p. 2, col. 7

Methodists:   Report of Bishop Strachan’s address to the three hundred students present at the first matriculation of students at King’s College. He complained that the college should have been a Church of England institution as Victoria College was under Methodist control and that Queen’s College was under Presbyterian control. Chronicle and Gazette June 21, 1843 p. 3, col. 2

Methodists:  Extract from a Methodist magazine on observance of the sabbath. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Nov. 20, 1841 p. 2, col. 5

Methodists:   Death on June 17, 1840, in England, of Rev. James Wood, Aged 89, the oldest Methodist Preacher in the world. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Aug. 12, 1840 p. 2, col. 1

Methodists:   Letter to the Grenville Gazette from an Episcopal Methodist disagreeing with the union of his church with the British Wesleyan Methodists. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 19, 1833 p. 3, col. 1

Methodists:  Resolutions of the English Wesleyan Conference relative to the union of the two classes of Methodist in Upper Canada. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 19, 1833 p. 3, col. 1

Methodists:   Letter to the Kingston Chronicle from “A Farmer” describing his conversion to Christianity, supporting the old-time Methodist preachers over the younger ones such as Mr. Ryan. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 14, 1832 p. 1, col. 6; p. 2, col. 1

Methodist:   Reviewer A Member of the Church of England, lengthy letter to the editor in reply to the letter from “Methodist Reviewer” on the church controversy. Kingston Chronicle Dec. 8, 1826 p. 2, col. 5; p. 3, col. 1-3

Methodist:   Preacher A Member of the Church of England, letter in the Upper Canada Herald and “Methodist Preacher”, “Reviewer” and letters in the Brockville Recorder. Kingston Chronicle Aug. 25, 1826 p. 2, col. 4-5; p. 3, col. 1-3

Methodist:   Preacher “A Church of England Man” is the author of a letter to the editor in reply to “Methodist Preacher” and “The Reviewer”. Reference to Dr. Strachan. Kingston Chronicle June 28, 1826 p. 2, col. 5. and p. 3, col. 1

Chippawa History
Before the British conquest of Canada, there was a French stockade located here at the confluence of the Chippawa Creek (now the Welland River) and the Niagara River. Between 1763 and 1764, British schooners were built on Navy Island opposite Chippawa for service on the Great Lakes. During the American Revolution, the British built a blockhouse called Fort Chippawa here.

The first settler, John Burch, who was in the second wave of west-bank settlers in 1783, obtained land on the north side of the creek. After he emigrated from England to New York, he set up as a tinsmith, becoming very wealthy and owning property on the Delaware River and in Albany. During the Revolutionary War, he had been the sutler to Butler’s Rangers, but, in Canada, his relationship with authorities was mixed. He wanted to build a sawmill and a gristmill on his property but the Army decided that a suitable site was just north of Dufferin Islands, about where the Toronto Generating building is now located. This was a not the best spot because it was more awkward for settlers to reach from the Portage Road. At that spot, the Portage Road was on top of the ridge and, to get to the mill down by the river, settlers had to walk almost to the Falls before they came to the narrow path leading down the ridge to the mill. However, his were the only mills in the area for many years so, bad site or no, he prospered. Later, he had to give up some of his land next to the Welland River when the Army decided to build Fort Chippawa on the north side of the river. Burch became a partner with Robert Hamilton in the Portage Syndicate, which controlled the movement of goods along the Portage Road. He is the man who ransomed Andrew Miller of Miller’s Creek.

The second settler was Thomas Cummings, a Scot from Albany, New York State. Cummings had been the manager of John Burch’s farm and his mother had also worked for Burch. He obtained a land grant at the mouth and south of Chippawa Creek and built a house there in 1783. He was an early store owner but his stores were destroyed during the War of 1812.

When the Army built Fort Chippawa, they also built a bridge, the King’s Bridge, across what had now become the Welland River. This bridge was closer to the Niagara River than the present bridge. The King’s Bridge was burned during the War of 1812 and was not replaced for some time. People crossed the river by ferry until Samuel Street Jr. built a bridge in 1816 to allow farmers south of the river to take their grain to Street’s Falls Mills, the old Burch mills, for milling. Street’s bridge was at about the same location as the present bridge, further upstream than the King’s Bridge.

Chippawa was the outlet for the first Welland Canal built in the late 1820s. The canal ran from Port Dalhousie on Lake Ontario to Port Robinson on the Welland River. A southbound ship would enter the canal at Port Dalhousie, sail up the canal to Port Robinson, pass through a lock into the Welland River, sail down the river to Chippawa, where oxen would tow the ship against the flow of the Niagara River to Fort Erie. Later, to avoid the laborious tow, the route of the canal was changed to take it from Port Robinson to Port Colborne, bypassing Chippawa.

Chippawa was also the terminal of Ontario’s first railway, the Erie and Ontario Railway, created to counter the drop in business on the Portage Road caused by the Welland Canal. This railway ran between Chippawa and Queenston, and was horse-drawn until 1854, when iron horses were first used.
…from “One-day trips through the history of Southwest Ontario” http://www.herontrips.com/

CorbettonMethDufferinCty…from Dufferin County Museum & Archives

According to sources at the United Church Archives in Toronto, including the Methodist Missionary Society Report, a Wesleyan Methodist congregation called Ebenezer was organized in the Corbetton area of Melancthon township about 1875. In 1885, the congregation’s name appears as “Corbetton” in the Missionary Society Report.
For the first ten years the congregation met in an old school, its exact location unknown. On October 15, 1885 the Corbetton congregation purchased part of Lot 260, Concession 1 SW (“Southwest”) of the Toronto and Sydenham Road in the Township of Melancthon. The land was sold by James and Jane Corbett, hotelkeepers, to the Trustees of the Corbetton Congregation of the Methodist Church of Canada for the sum of $70.00!

The Christian Guardian Newspaper reported on December 30, 1885 that the church was completed. The Guardian provides an informative account of the dedicatory service and the enthusiasm of the community for the building of the church. An excerpt reads:

“For many years the members of the Methodist Church at Corbetton and vicinity have, with considerable inconvenience, worshipped in a small and uncomfortably seated schoolhouse. Since last June there has been a large accession to the membership; and the friends of the cause, feeling more than ever the necessity of better accommodations, decided to erect a church…The building is 26 X 42, a scantling frame, on a stone foundation, veneered with brick, and now complete. A shed has been erected 66 feet long, the upper part of which is fitted up for an eating room on tea-meeting occasions. The building, grounds and shed, have cost, in cash $750. Besides this, there has been donated lumber and a large amount of labour. Some of the Trustees and friends, with a devotion seldom equaled have given their whole time to aiding those who were erecting the building, besides subscribing in money to the very utmost of their ability.”

Methodist Periodicals 1902

THE CHRISTIAN GUARDIAN.

EDITORS.
1881 to 1895 Rev. Edward Hartley Dewart, D.D.
1895 to 1903 Rev. Andrew Cory Courtice, B.D., D.I).
1903 Rev. George J. Bond, B. A.
ASSOCIATE EDITOR.
1884 to 1887 Rev. Samuel G. Stone, D.D.

ASSISTANT EDITORS.
1899 to 1900 Egerton R. Young, B.A.
1900 to 1902. . . . William B. Creighton, B.A., B.D.

In connection with the Union of the several Methodist Churches in 1884 it was agreed that The Canada Christian Advocate, the organ of The Methodist Episcopal Church, The Christian Journal, the organ of The Primitive Methodist Church, and The Observer, the organ of The Bible Christian Church, should be amalgamated with The Christian Guardian, the organ of The Methodist Church of Canada, and that the last named should be the organ of The Methodist Church, and that it should be sent for the remainder of the year to all the subscribers of the discontinued papers for the unexpired term of their paid-up subscriptions. This was done, and the constituency of The Christian Guardian was thereby considerably enlarged. On the first of January, 1885, its form was changed from a large double, double-demi sheet of eight pages to a folded sheet of sixteen pages, and on the first of January, 1903, its form was again changed so as to make a folded sheet of thirty-two pages, thus making it much more convenient for handling and for preservation.

At the General Conference of 1894 it was resolved to reduce the price for The. Guardian from two dollars to one dollar, with the hope of placing it more widely in the homes of our people.

The circulation has been as follows : On March 31st, 1882 11,232 copies., 1886 14,859 copies, 1890 13,094 copies, 1894 12,701 copies, 1898 21,616 copies, 1902 20,627 copies, 1903 21,730 copies
THE WESLEYAN.

EDITORS.
1881-1886 Rev. T. Watson Smith, D.D.
1887-1895 Rev. John Lathern, D.D.
1895-1903. . . .Rev. George J. Bond, B.A.
1903 .Rev. John Maclean, M.A., Ph.D.

THE METHODIST MAGAZINE AND REVIEW.

. EDITOR.
1881-1902 Rev. William Henry Withrow, M.A., D.D., F.R.C.S.

At the General Conference of 1902 Dr. Withrow was unanimously elected Editor for the Quadrennium 1902-1906. This valuable Magazine and Review has now completed its fifty sixth volume and twenty-eighth year. Year after year it retains its hold upon the patronage of the public, and exhibits continuous improvement in its literary character and in its beautiful artistic illustrations of many lands, and especially of the lands of the Bible.

It’s wise discussion of many important social problems, it’s valuable articles on Missionary and Religious topics, it’s character studies of the world s great leaders of thought and action, its many
interesting serial and other stories, and it’s valuable papers on popular science, meets a long-felt want among our people,and ought to secure for it a very much larger circulation than it now enjoys.
Its circulation on March 31st, 1902, was 2,726, an increase of 78 over the preceding
Quadrennium.

SUNDAY SCHOOL PERIODICALS.

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL BANNER.

EDITOR.
1881-1902 Rev. William Henry Withrow, M.A., D.D., F.R.C.S.

This is a monthly magazine for Sunday School teachers and all students of the Bible. From a circulation of 5,000 copies per month  it has increased to 15,353. During the past Quadrennium it has been considerably enlarged and improved.

ONWARD

This paper had its birth on January 1st, 1891, and has been published weekly since that date. It supplanted Home and School, which was a fortnightly paper having a circulation of 43,093, equalling a weekly circulation of 21,546. Onward, as a paper for senior classes, has proven a grand success. It devotes especial attention to the exposition of the Sunday School lessons, and gives prominence to the Missionary work of our own Church. Its special Dominion Day and other loyal and patriotic numbers have been highly educative in their tendency, producing a spirit of loyalty to the institutions of our country which must be productive of great good in the rising generation.

It’s circulation in 1894 was 29,851 copies, 1898 33,370 copies It’s circulation in 1902 was 39,093

PLEASANT HOURS
A paper designed for intermediate scholars is published every week. It has proven itself to be increasingly popular as may be seen from the following figures.

It’s circulation in 1882 was 35,724 copies, 1886  35,863 copies, 1890  48,272 copies, 1894 was 46,151 copies, 1898  49,218 copies, 1902  51,917 copies

SUNBEAM
A paper for the Juniors is published fortnightly.

It’s circulation in 1886 was 22,592 copies, 1898  31,429 copies, 1902 32,027 copies

HAPPY DAYS.
A paper for the Juniors was born on January 1st, 1886. It is published fortnightly, so that, with its companion Sunbeam, the Juniors have an interesting illustrated paper every week.

It’s circulation on March 31st, 1886, was 15,354 copies, 1890  24,789 copies, 1894  28,204 copies, 1898   28,023 copies,  1902  29,919 copies

DEW DROPS.

A paper for the Infant Classes commenced publication January 1st, 1897

It’s circulation on March 31st, 1898, was 15,766 copies,  1902   21,212 copies

BEREAN INTERMEDIATE QUARTERLY
This is a Scholar’s Lesson Help and takes the place of the Berean Leaf Quarterly. It’s circulation
on March 31st, 1894, was 11,986 copies, 1902  32,264 copies,  1898   19.4721 copies

BEREAN LEAF MONTHLY
Its circulation March 31st, 1886, was 41,510 copies,1890  69,042 copies, 1894  83,679 copies, 1898,  72,979 copies, 1902  62,980 copies
NOTE The Berean Leaf Monthly is being superseded by the Berean Intermediate Quarterly,
which is of much superior value.

THE CANADIAN EPWORTH ERA
The publication of this new monthly was authorized by the General Conference of 1898, and
the Rev. Albert Clarke Crews was elected as its Editor.

At the General Conference of 1902 he was unanimously re-elected for another Quadrennium. The paper is the official organ of the Epworth Leagues.

It’s circulation March 31st, 1902, was 5,165 I Its circulation March 31st, 1903, was 6,265

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