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Archive for December, 2012

 

Rev. John Hick

1815 Charlottetown PEI, 1850 Montreal,

Minister of British Wesleyan Methodist Society congregation at Quebec, married Catherine Fisher of Montreal; Reverend Sutcliff officiated. Wedding at home of bride’s brother, John Fisher. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 13, 1833 p. 4, col. 1,

Kingston Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society, notice of a meeting in the British Wesleyan Chapel, sermon by Rev. John Hick. Kingston Chronicle Aug. 30, 1828 p. 3, col. 4,

Hick, Rev. John Of Montreal, to deliver a sermon at the meeting of the British Methodist Chapel. Kingston Chronicle Sept. 1, 1820 p. 3, col. 4

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Rev. Thomas Turner

Charges:

1830 Kingston, 1840-1845 Christie’s/Scarborough (York Cty)

Mrs. Turner wife of Rev. Thomas Turner, Wesleyan Missionary, birth of a daughter. Kingston Chronicle Feb. 6, 1830 p. 3, col. 2;

Turner contributor to the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. Kingston Chronicle Apr. 23, 1831 p. 3, col. 2

British Wesleyan Missionaries Revs. Alder and Turner arrive in Kingston en route to Lake St. Clair to establish British Wesleyan mission. Kingston Chronicle Jan. 9, 1832 p. 3, col. 1

Christie’s Methodist Cemetery

2900 Warden Ave., north of Finch Ave.

Literally located in the middle of the parking lot at Bridlewood Mall, Christie’s Methodist Cemetery is an important piece of the history of Scarborough’s L’Amoreaux neighbourhood. In 1836, Irish immigrants Isaac Christie and Isabella Graeme bought 100 acres of farmland where the tiny cemetery sits from United Empire Loyalist and Huguenot Josué L’Amoreaux. Not long after, Wesleyan Methodist leader Reverend T. Turner convinced the couple to allow him to build a small church, which included a cemetery, on their property. Burials were done at this site until the 1920’s until the United Church finally closed the church down for good in 1938. Home to a large indoor horse racing track for a time, this land became home of Bridlewood Mall in the mid-1970s. The Scarborough Historical Society was instrumental in saving this historic cemetery from being bulldozed after it convinced the developers to save the graveyard. Discussions are currently underway to redevelop the mall and surrounding lands into high-rise dwellings.

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Rev. Matthew Lang

1835 Toronto District Book Steward

Charges:

1837 Toronto (residence Newgate St. E.), 1847-1848 Odelltown

British Wesleyan Missionary Association     Regarding meeting held on Jan. 27, 1841, in Kingston. Mr. Kirkpatrick is chairman. Main speakers were Rev. Dyer, W. Case, Rev. Joseph Stinson, Rev. John Sunday, Rev. James Booth, Mr. David Benson, and Rev. Mathew Lang. List of officers elected: James Fraser, treasurer; Charles Hales, secretary; Committee members: John Counter, David Benson, Mr. Jenkins, John Shaw, Thomas Milner, Wm. Denn, Wm. Johnson, Joseph Milner, Mr. Oyerend, Wm. Whaim, James Linton, Chas. W. Jenkins, Richard Gibson, T. Palmer, and Thomas O’Neil. Details of the meeting and resolutions passed. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 30, 1841 p. 2, col. 5, 6

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KerfootUCInteriorManHistSocSCOTTJONATHAN, Methodist clergyman, born May 5, 1803 at Nottingham, England; died May 5, 1880 at Brampton, Ontario

Jonathan Scott was converted at Chesterfield, England, in 1816 and joined the Wesleyan Church. He became a candidate for the ministry in 1834 and was immediately sent to the Canada Conference as a missionary by the British Wesleyan Conference. Received on trial by the Canada Conference in that year, he was sent to the Grape Island Indian mission (in the Bay of Quinte) where he remained until 1836. He was then ordained and stationed at the Lake Simcoe and Coldwater Indian mission. From 1834 to 1840 he was a frequent contributor to the Christian Guardian on Wesleyan missions to the Indians, criticizing the government’s Indian policy under Sir Francis Bond Head, and defending the integrity of Indian converts.

Scott was stationed on the Goderich mission by the conference of 1839, but the appointment was immediately changed so that he might be acting editor of the Christian Guardian during the absence of its editor, the Reverend Egerton Ryerson.

In 1840 the union of the Canada Conference with the British Conference of the Wesleyan Methodist Church was dissolved and Scott remained with the former. His appointment as editor was renewed each year by the conference but in 1844 it declined to reappoint him; according to John Carroll the conference felt that Scott had worn the nib off his pen a little by long use. During Scott’s editorship, the Guardian became a strictly religious paper avoiding political pronouncements and confining itself largely to a defence of evangelical Protestantism, more especially Methodist doctrine and polity. Much space was devoted to attacks on high church Anglicanism and on Roman Catholicism. The contrast between the paper under his editorship and that of Ryerson is quite marked.

In 1844 Scott returned to circuit work,  in which he excelled. The conference of 1845 elected him secretary, in order, according to Carroll, to assuage wounded feelings over his dismissal from the editorship of the Guardian. He refused the appointment, however, and continued in the itinerant ministry until 1854, serving on the circuits of Stamford, Cobourg, Port Hope, Perth, and Cooksville.

He dropped from the itinerant ministry in 1854, because of his wife’s ill health, and became an assistant to Rev. Enoch Wood, the superintendent of missions, at the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society office in Toronto. He was superannuated in 1868 and moved to Brampton, where he died.

…from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography

by  C. Glenn Lucas

UCA, Minutes of the Canada Conference of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, 1834–74; Minutes of the Conference of the Methodist Church of Canada, 1874–80. Christian Guardian (Toronto), 1834–80. Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, Missionary Society, Annual Reports (Toronto), 1834–41. Carroll, Case and his cotemporaries, IV, V.

Rev. Jonathon Scott was born in 1803 in England and was received on trial in 1834

Charges:

1837-1838 Coldwater (Simcoe Cty), 1846 Cobourg, 1850 Perth, 1851 Cooksville, 1853 Toronto Twp., 1854-1855 Cooksville superannuated, 1869-1871 Brampton (retired)

Notices:

British Wesleyan Methodists new missionaries recently arrived from Liverpool, including Rev. Slight, Scott, Steer, Douse, Gladwin, Rea. Mr. Steer to be stationed at Kingston.     Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jul. 19, 1834 p. 2, col. 5

Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada Comments made by William Lyon Mackenzie re its formation. Reference to ministers Slight, Scott, Steer, Douse, Rea, Gladwin who have come upon the request of Egerton Ryerson. Mackenzie describes them as “Tories” British Whig (Kingston) June 29, 1834 p. 3, col. 4

1871 Census
Scott, Jonathan
Sex:Male
Age:68
Place of Birth:England
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Peel
Sub-District Name:Brampton
Family: Wife  Susan was born in 1791 in England

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Rev. William Steer was born in 1799 in England Wesleyan Methodist and was received on trial in 1834 at Kingston

Charges:

1835 Gananoque, 1836 Grimsby, ordained 1837-1838 at Murray, 1839-1840 London, 1841-1842 Barrie, 1843 Rice Lake, 1844 Kingston, 1845-1846 Chinguacousy, 1847-1848 Scugog, 1849 Brock, 1850-1851 Rama, 1852 Erin/Garafraxa (Wellington Cty), 1853-1855 Mono superannuated, 1855 Three Rivers, 1856-1872 Cobourg/Baltimore (retired), 1871 Haldimand Twp. (Northumberland Cty), 1873-1883 Grafton (retired),

Baptisms:

LEGATE John son of Joh Mary was born on March 21, 1852 in  Garafraxa Twp. Wellington Cty and was baptized on July 27, 1852 at  Grafraxa by Rev. William  Steer

Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada Comments made by William Lyon Mackenzie re its formation. Reference to ministers Slight, Scott, Steer, Douse, Rea, Gladwin who have come upon the request of Egerton Ryerson. Mackenzie describes them as “Tories” British Whig (Kingston) June 29, 1834 p. 3, col. 4

British Wesleyan Methodists new missionaries recently arrived from Liverpool, including Rev. Slight, Scott, Steer, Douse, Gladwin, Rea. Mr. Steer to be stationed at Kingston.     Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jul. 19, 1834 p. 2, col. 5

1881 Census

Steer, Rev. William
Sex:M
Age:83
Place of Birth:England
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:English
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Northumberland West
Sub-District Name:Haldimand

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ellis63BWRev. John Law was born in 1806 in Fermanagh County, Ireland and died on September 7th., 1869

He was received on trial in 1833 Lindsay/Cavan

Charges:

1834 Dumfries/York, Toronto District, 1835 London, 1836 Brantford, ordained in 1837 at Grimsby, 1838 Nelson, 1839-1840 Yonge Street, 1842 Stamford, 1842-1844 Toronto Circuit, 1845-1846 Dumfries/Blenheim (Oxford Cty)/Paris Plains, 1847-1848 St. Catharines/Thorold, 1849-1850 Humber, 1851-1852 Oshawa, 1853-1854 Markham, 1855 Georgetown, 1856 Milton, 1857-1858 Sidney (Hastings Cty), 1859-1861 Prince Albert, 1862-1868 Whitby (retired),

Notices:

1834 Dumfries – Conrad Vandusen and John Law appointed clergymen for the Wesleyan Methodist Church for Dumfries in the York, or Toronto District for the year. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jun. 21, 1834 p. 2, col. 6,

Law, John Rev.     Appointed Wesleyan minister for Dumfries in the York, or Toronto District.     Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 21, 1834 p. 2, col. 6

August 12 1845, William Ellis married Dorothy Howell, witnesses Jonah Howell and David Ellis. Rev. John Law, Wesleyan Methodist in Dumfries

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Extract of a letter from the Rev. John Law, dated London, January 17, 1836

Our worthy and respected chairman and my colleague being so much engaged in the District, it has fallen to my lot to report to you the prosperous state of our circuit and the mission attached to it.. This being my first communication to the Christian Guardian, I am happy to say that I rejoice that we have so easy and expeditious a means of gladdening the hearts of our brethren and friends through its extensive circulation.

My very respected superintendent has laboured beyond his strength, and I am fearful he will not be able to bear up under such exertions very long. This is a painful thought to my mind as well as to the minds of the friends in the circuit and district, as his labours are so valuable both as a superintendent and a chairman.

As it regards our circuit, it must be remembered that, notwithstanding we have two preachers appointed, a great part of Brother Wright’s time is taken up in his other appointments in the district; and a part of my time as well as some of Brother Woight’s is spent in our mission to Warwick and Adelaide; and yet we are enabled through the assistance of a Local Preacher, our highly esteemed Brother Millar, to do the work of two preachers on our circuit.

We are grateful to Almighty God that our members are advancing in piety, and manifesting and increasing attachment to our doctrines, our discipline, and the general cause of true religion; we can likewise say, that we have peace in all our borders.

We have lately formed some new classes and added several to the old classes; one in particular in the Mordeau’s Settlement has greatly increased since our coming on the circuit, Our late protracted and Quarterly meeting in the London village, has been especially owned of God : eighteen new members joined us, and a blessed feeling has been produced. A very great impression was made on the minds of the people after the lovefeast, by a sermon on the “Barren fig tree,” preached by Brother Wright. The lovefeast, also, was a remarkable time of refreshing from the presence of the Lord.

Our mission, to which I have referred, and of which you lately had some account in the communication of our respected Brother Crealy, is also doing well. In my late vist there, I was providentially led to a part of Adelaide where we had not been before; I preached twice and formed a class of 12 members; we have also a small class at our Brother pegley’s, and another in Warwick of 20 members. I am highly gratified with the prospects of scriptural holiness being spread in every part of Adelaide and Warwick, where we and Brother Crealy have laboured. I may add, that our work in this mission is laborious in the extreeme; my late visit was particularly so, as I had to perform the journey on foot, in consequence of the bad roads. I had to walk from seventy to eighty mile, and preached eight times. Our Brother Wilkinson has referred to areport circulated of chapels and members going from us to other people, particularly in the west of this province, a report by the bye, which had not the least shadow of truth in it as respects our circuit, and I believe equally untrue as far as Brother Wright’s district is concerned. Having given you a brief account of the state of our circuit, permit me to express my appreciation of the Christian Guardian, and the pleasure I have from time to time in reading in its columns of the sucess of God’s cause in this province and the world in general.

—  000  —

LONDON, 27th Apri 1836.

” I am happy to inform you that our Circuit is still in a prosperous state; we had our fourth Quarterly Meeting last Saturday and Sunday, which was attended with a general blessing from the Lord.
Much valuable business was transacted, which we trust will be of great and lasting benefit to the circuit. We are also thankful to say that our Quarterly Conference was conducted in great peace and unity. It is a cause of gratitude to God that our circuit is doing well, both in spiritual and temporal things. The spirit of scriptural holiness, intelligence, and union, is advancing in this circuit. Our financial matters are in good condition; the Stewards will be able to meet the demands against them. As it regards the collection for the superannuated preachers, and the widows and orphans of those preachers who have died in the work, we shall have something more than last year. When we consider the liberality of our friends, besides what they have done towards the support of Missions, and what they are now doing for the Bible Society, we have cause to be grateful to the Lord, who disposes the hearts of his people to assist in the spread of his Gospel to the heathen abroad and the ungodly at home. We have had a goodly increase of members this year, but the exact number will be reported at the District Meeting.”

from  Case and his cotemporaries, or, The Canadian itinerants’ memorial:  – Rev John Carroll

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Rev. Edward Grinrod – President of Methodist Canada Conference

Notices:

 

Rev.  Grinrod and Mr. Alder, Secretary of Wesleyan Missionary Society to preach in New York. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 5, 1834 p. 2, col. 5;

William Lord is to be president of the Wesleyan Methodist conference of Upper Canada, according to information received by Rev. Grinrod and Rev. Alder   Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Oct. 4, 1831 p. 2, col. 6;

Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada Letter to Sir John Colborne from Edmund Grinrod, President, and James Richardson, secretary, avowing loyalty of the Church to Great Britain and referring (implicitly) to the Hume Letter. British Whig (Kingston) June 8, 1834 p. 2, col. 5

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Rev. John Armstrong was born in 1803 in Ireland and was received on trial in 1829 and was ordained in 1833 Methodist Episcopal

Charges:

1828 Niagara, 1829 Toronto Twp., 1830 Dumfries, 1831 Long Point, 1832 Nelson, 1833 joined Wesleyan Conference, 1833 Binbrook/Ancaster, 1834 Thorold/St. Catharines, 1835 Goderich/ Saugeen, 1836 Peterborough, 1837-1838 Mississippi, 1839-1840 Clarendon, 1841-1842 St. Andrews, 1843-1844 Richmond, 1845-1846 Osgoode/Gloucester (Dalhousie), 1847-1849 Buckingham, 1850-1851 Gatineau, 1852-1853 Peel/Maryborough (Wellington Cty), 1854-1855 Grey Cty, 1855-1856 Wallace/Howick (retired), 1859 Williamsburgh (Simcoe Cty), 1862 N.Gower (Dalhousie), 1867 Listowel, 1871 Wallace (Perth Cty), 1881 Huron Centre (Grey Cty)

Armstrong, J. Rev. – Appointed Wesleyan minister for St. Catharines in Niagara District. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Jan. 21, 1834 p. 2, col. 6

1871 Census
Armstrong, John
Sex:Male
Age:68
Place of Birth:Ireland
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Perth North
Sub-District Name:Wallace
Family:  Wife  Sarah was born in 1800 in England
1881 Census

Armstrong, Rev John
Sex:M
Age:78
Place of Birth:Ireland
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:Irish
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Huron Centre
Sub-District Name:Grey

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Rev. Vincent B. Howard was born in 1811 in Ontario and was received on trial in 1833

Charges:

 

1835 Rideau (Augusta), 1840 Stirling Rawdon Twp. (Hastings Cty), 1854-1855 Demorestville (Hastings Cty), 1859-1869 Cobourg (retired), 1871-1881 Cobourg (Northumberland Cty)

Rev. J. Carroll married him to Miss Sophia M. Arnold, in Gananoque on Feb. 16, 1841. . She is the 5th daughter of Richard Arnold, Esq., of the Johnstown District. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 20, 1841 p. 3, col. 2,

Made a speech at the tea meeting for the benefit of the Kingston Dorcas Society held in connection with the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada in the chapel on Wellington and Johnson Streets. Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 17, 1844 p. 3, col. 1;

1871 Census:
Howard, Vincent B
Sex:Male
Age:60
Place of Birth:Ontario
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Northumberland West
Sub-District Name:Cobourg
Family  Wife  Sophia was born in 1816 in Ontario, George 20 Soap Manufacturer, Lillian 20, John 19, Eliza 16, Julia 12

1881 Census

Howard, Vincent B
Sex:M
Age:70
Place of Birth:Ontario
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:English
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Northumberland West
Sub-District Name:Cobourg

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HARVARDWILLIAM MARTIN, Methodist minister; born c. 1790 in England, probably in the London area; married on November 23, 1813 Elizabeth Parks in London, and they had five sons, two of whom died in infancy; died on December 14, 1857 in Richmond (London).

William Martin Harvard was evidently trained as a printer. In 1810 he became a probationer for the ministry in the Wesleyan Methodist Conference and in 1813 volunteered to join the Rev. Thomas Coke and others in establishing Methodist missions in India and Ceylon (Sri Lanka). As a prospective foreign missionary Harvard was ordained in 1813 in London. Subsequently, Coke performed Harvard’s marriage ceremony. In December Coke and his companions sailed from Portsmouth on the long voyage to India, but Coke’s contributions to the missionary enterprise of the conference ended when he died at sea. Harvard conducted the funeral service, and the party proceeded to its destination. He remained in the India–Ceylon mission until 1819 when ill health forced his return to England. His well-written but discursive account of the inception and growth of the mission to India was published in 1823, the year his wife died.

Harvard regained his health at home, and between 1819 and 1835 he was stationed on several circuits in southern England. In 1836 he was appointed president of the Canadian conference, an office he held until 1838, and chairman of the Lower Canada District. He arrived in Montreal on 16 October and immediately assumed his duties there. A year later he moved to Toronto. Rev. John Saltkill Carroll described him as “commanding in person, almost the fac simile of General Washington; dignified in his carriage; polite in his manners; pre-eminently Christian in his spirit; and unusually faithful as a minister.” At first he impressed the Canadian ministers much more favourably than had his predecessor, the Reverend William Lord.

Harvard’s appointment as president came at an unpropitious juncture in the relationship between the English and Canadian conferences. The two had united in 1833 to form the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. In the mean time, in England, the Wesleyan Methodist Conference had come to be defined as a church, with a ministry ordained by the imposition of hands, whose authority could not be shared with local preachers or class leaders, and in which the conference was sovereign. The church’s leaders accepted the established church and were intensely hostile to those – usually the same persons – who promoted disestablishment and radical politics. Harvard evidently shared these views and was slow to learn that the conference in Upper Canada was not wholly of the same mind.

By 1836 some members of the latter conference were becoming disillusioned with the union. Two years earlier the union had precipitated a secession led by disgruntled local preachers who established a new organization, the Methodist Episcopal Church in Canada. Within the conference, the Wesleyan sympathizers urged that the Christian Guardian become a solely religious journal, supportive if necessary of the political status quo, and that the conference accept a share of the clergy reserves income, were a division of the reserves to occur. The Canadian leaders, and probably the majority of their followers, were dubious at best, or outright opposed to the Wesleyans’ position. As for Harvard, in a letter to the Rev. Robert Alder in January 1837, he commented that the Methodists could use a share of the clergy reserves for chapels, schools, and parsonages. “The Scotch people,” he wrote to the Rev. Egerton Ryerson in May, “are making a grand effort for the clergy reserves. We might find a slice of the loaf highly helpful for our Parsonage houses, Supernumerary Preachers, and students for the ministry at Cobourg. . . . I should be unutterably vexed to be disinherited of our just ground of expectation.” Harvard doubtless had some part in framing the equivocal resolutions adopted by the conference in 1837, in which the exclusive claims of Anglicans and Presbyterians were condemned and the conference’s willingness to accept a share of the reserves “for the religious and educational improvement of the Province” was indicated. Not surprisingly, he continued to press for the payment of the government grant to the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society.

Given his conservative proclivities, Harvard was intensely agitated by the disturbances in the colony in December 1837. He believed that if the rebels had succeeded, all pro-British citizens would have been massacred, and he was cheered by the support for the government in Toronto and elsewhere. This support, he concluded, “would tend greatly to tranquillise the public mind and thus to forward the cause of godliness in this Province.” In contrast, in March 1838, the Rev. John Ryerson exclaimed: “Never were the prospects of the friends of Civil & Religious liberty so gloomy & desperate as they now are; & Harvard & [Rev. Ephraim Evans] love to have it so. Mr. H is a weak high-church despot & Evans is his intire tool.

Harvard would provide confirmation of this assessment with the publication the next month in the Guardian of a pastoral letter to the ministers in Upper Canada of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. Having learned that there were Methodists who had “not done honour to their Christian profession, during the late unnatural rebellion,” he thought it imperative to state that “some opinions . . . so involve the very vitals of morality as that they are never found associated in the same bosom with fervent piety and deep devotedness to God.” In “a question of loyalty to the Sovereign of an Empire, the Government may well say, in the words of our adorable Saviour, ‘He that is not with me is against me.’” Thus he instructed the district chairmen to require every minister to scrutinize the loyalty of all members. “Should there be a single individual, for whose Christian loyalty the Preacher cannot conscientiously answer to his brethren, . . . such individual should be dealt with, kindly and compassionately, but firmly, according to the provisions of the Book of Discipline.” He reminded his brethren that in Britain the Methodists were known for their “faithful attachment” to the crown.

Perhaps to Harvard’s surprise, his statement stirred up sharp controversy among the Methodists. “Last night,” he reported to Alder, “I was rather rudely arrested by one of our Leaders and a local preacher who termed my letter a bull – that I was acting like a Pope.” In a later issue of the Guardian he insisted that he did not intend to take away church membership from anyone “merely on account of party politics.” Doubtless he was distressed to learn from Egerton Ryerson that he had read the letter “with great pain and regret.” Ryerson stressed that disaster would result “if the undoubted constitutional right of individual judgment and discussion on political matters is not fully understood and mutually acknowledged by all.” Ryerson’s private letter was accompanied by the publication in the Guardian of a lengthy statement entitled “What is Christian Loyalty?” in which he recalled that John Wesley “gives the right hand of fellowship to those who differ from him in opinion on many points . . . , nor can we with any reason or propriety, allow less latitude and liberty of sentiment on doctrines and measures of government.”

Undaunted, Harvard asked Ryerson, “How can we keep our Methodist stage from going deeply again into Radical mud . . . but to keep well off from the ditch while we turn this corner?” Harvard wished “to see Canadian Wesleyan Methodism become more and more Wesleyan, and this will make it the glory of the land. It appears to me that to Americanize it will be to neutralize it.” He presided with equanimity at the conference in June 1838. Many there, however, must have shared John Ryerson’s opinion that “Mr. Harvard [is] a very dangerous man. . . . You would be surprised to see how he has been runing about [Toronto], fawning, bowing, smiling, eulogizing, flattering, etc. . . . to make proselites to himself & Mr. Evans.” No doubt they were relieved to learn that the missionary society had decided already to station him in Quebec.

Harvard remained in the Lower Canada District until 1845, acting as chairman throughout that period. In the latter year he returned to Toronto as chairman of the Canada Western District which had been created after the dissolution of the union between the Wesleyan and Canadian conferences in 1840. During his tenure in Toronto as chairman, an appointment proposed by the Rev. Matthew Richey, his role became that of helping persuade his recalcitrant brethren to accept the re-union of the two conferences in 1847. This must have been a difficult task, for he was not alone in considering the disruption of 1840 “a providential opening” for the establishment of a truly Wesleyan connection in Upper Canada. Throughout the pre-union negotiation, he urged that the Wesleyans and the Canadian Methodists should go their separate ways and “agree to differ. Reunion should be effected only on condition that the British conference secured supreme control over the Canadian conference. In the end the Wesleyans settled for less than Harvard thought wise, but he worked loyally with Alder to bring the Canada Western District into line. Clearly, however, his usefulness was at an end and in 1847 he was assigned to the Maidstone circuit in England.

At home, Harvard was appointed in succession to the Maidstone, Portsmouth, and Norwich circuits, and finally in 1855 he became house governor of the southern branch of the Wesleyan Theological Institution, in Richmond. He died in office in 1857, after experiencing a time of turmoil in the English conference over the status to be assigned to ordained ministers.

Harvard’s brethren recorded that “his character was distinguished by lowliness and sanctity . . . . He was faithful in the exercise of his ministry; ‘gentle’ among the churches . . . esteemed and beloved by a multitude on both sides of the Atlantic.” He epitomized much of the Wesleyan Methodism of his generation in his conviction that its polity, missionary zeal, loyalty to British institutions, and conservatism made it a form of Methodism superior to all others. His kindly temper and courtesy enabled him to persuade many that the unadventurous Methodism he proclaimed was the one most likely to succeed in his time…G. S. French…from Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online

William Martin Harvard’s writings include The Gospel warning: a sermon occasioned by the death of Private JJenny . . . (London, 1818); The faith of departed saints: an unperishable monument of instruction and admonition to survivors; a funeral sermon, occasioned by the lamented death of his late most gracious majesty, George III, of religious and blessed memory, preached at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Duke Street, Deal, on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 1820, being the day appointed for the interment of his late majesty (Deal, Eng., 1820); A narrative of the establishment and progress of the mission to Ceylon and India, founded by the late RevThomas Coke, L.L.D., under the direction of the Wesleyan-Methodist Conference . . . (London, 1823); The substance of a funeral sermon, delivered in the Wesleyan Chapel, StJames Street, Montreal, on Sunday, August 13, 1837, on occasion of the lamented demise of his most gracious majesty, William the Fourth (Montreal, 1837); Remarks and suggestions, respectfully offered, on that portion of the clergy reserve property, (landed and funded,) of Upper Canada“not specifically appropriated to any particular church”; in a letter addressed to His Excellency Sir George Arthur, KC.B ., governor, and commander-in-chief . . . (Quebec, 1838; 2nd ed., 1839); Defence of protracted meetings: special efforts for the souls of men justified, and observers of such efforts admonished, in a discourse delivered in StAnn Street Chapel, Quebec, a second edition of which, published at London and Quebec during the 1840s, is available at the UCA; No honesty separate from veracity; the unrighteous monopoly, (by an intolerant party in the Church of England,) of “whatever Christian knowledge Canada possesses,” examined, exposed, and rebuked; to which is added: a defence of the Wesleyan Methodists, and other orthodox churches in Canada, against the “unchristian bitterness,” “violent dealing,” and misrepresentation, of the theological professor of M’Gill College, Montreal (Montreal, 1845); Facts against falsehood: the false allegations . . . made by the “Christian Guardian, (the official organ of the Upper Canada Conference,) against the missionaries of the British Wesleyan Conference, in Western Canada . . . fully and forcibly disproved . . . (Toronto, 1846; copy at UCA); and Five defensive letters in behalf of the British Wesleyan Conference and their missionary society . . . against the attacks of the Canada Conference Journal (Toronto, 1846). He is also the author of Memoirs of MrsElizabeth Harvard, late of the Wesleyan mission to Ceylon and India; with extracts from her diary and correspondence, a biography of his wife prepared following her death in 1823; a copy of the 3rd edition (London, 1833) is at the UCA.

SOAS, Methodist Missionary Soc. Arch., Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Soc., corr.., North America, 1837–47 (mfm. at UCA). Jabez Bunting, Early Victorian Methodism: the correspondence of Jabez Bunting, 1830–1858, ed. W. R. Ward (Oxford and New York, 1976). Wesleyan Methodist Church, Minutes of the conferences (London), 5 (1819–24): 102; 8 (1836–39): 47; 10 (1844–47): 198, 466; 13 (1855–57): 26; 14 (1858–62): 8–9. Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, The minutes of the annual conferences . . . from 1824 to 1845 . . . (Toronto, 1846), 168. Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine (London), 42 (1819): 714; 60 (1837): 72. Christian Guardian, 30 Nov. 1836; 15 Nov. 1837; 18, 25 April, 9 May 1838. Cornish, Cyclopædia of Methodism. Carroll, Case and his cotemporaries, 4: 131. French, Parsons & politics. J. E. Sanderson, The first century of Methodism in Canada (2v., Toronto, 1908–10), 1: 390–91, 393, 398, 404, 413, 420. C. B. Sissons,Egerton Ryerson: his life and letters (2v., Toronto, 1937–47), 1: 379, 433, 471, 473.

Rev. William Martin Harvard

Charges:

To address the anniversary of the Kingston Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society, to be held at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 16, 1839 p. 3, col. 2;

British Wesleyan Methodist Society     The organization has appointed Rev. Wm. Harvard as president of the conference for the ensuing year.     British Whig Oct. 7, 1836 p. 2, col. 2

He and Egerton Ryerson, signed the congratulatory address from the Wesleyan Methodist Church to Sir George Arthur. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 25, 1838 p. 2, col. 4;

Report in the Christian Guardian that he will leave Upper Canada for Quebec. The Royal Commissioner there has requested an agent to involve himself in the interests of the Wesleyan Methodist missions in the British American Provinces. British Whig (Kingston) June 16, 1838 p. 2, col. 2;

To preach at the Methodist Chapel in Rear St. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette Feb. 15, 1837 p. 3, col. 3;

He was appointed president of the British Wesleyan Methodist Conference for the ensuing year. British Whig (Kingston) Oct. 7, 1836 p. 2, col. 2;

Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada – Letter from Lt. Gov. Sir George Arthur to Rev. Harvard re Clergy’ reserves. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette May 13, 1839 p. 2, col. 1

Arthur, Sir George – A congratulatory address from Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada, signed by W. M. Harvard, President and Egerton Ryerson, Secretary. Arthur’s reply. Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 25, 1838 p. 2, col. 4

Arthur, Sir George – Letter to him from Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society, London England re Wesleyan Methodist Church in Canada. Kingston Chronicle and. Gazette, May 18, 1839  p. 2, col. 1, 2

British Wesleyan Methodists     Address to Sir Charles Metcalfe by Rev. Wm. M. Harvard and Matthew Richey on Behalf of the “Wesleyan Missionaries of Eastern and Western Canada, Members of the British Conference”     Kingston Chronicle and Gazette June 15, 1843 p. 3, col. 2

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