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Archive for January, 2013

Rev. Donald George Sutherland  M.A. LL.B. B.D. was born on Apr 12, 1839 in Toronto son of Captain James Sutherland who was born in Hoy, Orkney Island and died in 1857, and Margaret Robinson Sutherland born in Lincolnshire, England who died in 1878.

He graduated in in Law in 1859 from Victoria College and was received on trial in 1864 and was ordained in 1868 at the hand of Rev. Morley Punshon D.D.

In 1872 he married Helena, eldest daughter of the Hon. J.C. Aikins, then senator and later lieutenant-governor of Manitoba and they had four children. One daughter, Evelyn, married, in 1891, Rev. James H. Stevenson in Toronto.

Charges:

 

1867-1869 Brampton, 1869 Churchville (Peel Cty), Milton, Oakville, Dundas, Brampton, Kingston, Gananoque, Galt, Simcoe, Clinton, St. Thomas, 1883-1884 secretary London conference

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Rev. George T. Richardson was born in 1823 in Oakhampton Devonshire England, arrived in Canada summer of 1853 and in 1854 he was  on trial

Charges:

1854-1855 Brock (Barrie), 1861 Carden (Colbourne), 1869 Blenheim, 1871 Harwich (Kent Cty), 1874-1875 Greenwood/Brougham, 1881 Reach (Ontario Cty)

1871 Census

Surname: RICHARDSON

Given Name: GEORGE T

Occupation: MINISTER

Gender: Male

Age: 48

Place of Birth: ENGLAND

Religion: Wesleyan Methodist

Ethnic Origin: ENGLISH

District Name: KENT

District Number: 2

Sub-District Name: Harwich

1881 Census

Richardson, G.F.
Sex:M
Age:57
Place of Birth:England
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:English
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Ontario North
Sub-District Name:Reach

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Rev. George L. Richardson was born in 1834 in Ontario. He  was received on trial in 1854 at the Belleville Conference, New Connexion

Charges:

1869 Millgrove (Wentworth Cty), 1871 London City, 1881 Aylmer (Elgin Cty),  1889 President Guelph Conference

1881 Census
Richardson, George
Sex:M
Age:46
Place of Birth:Ontario
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:English
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Elgin East
Sub-District Name:Aylmer

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Rev. William R. Parker D.D. M.A. was born in 1832 in Ontario and was received on trial in 1856, 1855 graduated from Victoria College

Charges

1859 Hamilton (Wentworth Cty), 1869-1871 Brantford (Brant Cty), 1881 Thorold (Welland), 1882 Moorehouse/Florence Circuit chairman of district, 1884-1887 St. Thomas (Elgin Cty),  1891 Barrie (Simcoe Cty), 1895 Toronto Conference President

1871 Census

Parker, William R
Sex:Male
Age:39
Place of Birth:Ontario
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Brant South
Sub-District Name:Brantford
Family: Wife Annie T. was born in 1842 in Quebec, Florence Alexandra 5, Robert 1, Ellis M. Ruston 20, Mary Holtby 22 servant
1881 Census
Parker, William R.
Sex:M
Age:49
Place of Birth:Ontario
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:Irish
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Welland
Sub-District Name:Thorold
Family:  Wife Annie T. was born in 1842 in Ontario, Alexandra 15, William 8
1891 Census
Parker, W R
Sex:Male
Age:58
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Simcoe North
Sub-District Name:Barrie
Family:  Wife Annie T. was born in 1842 in Ontario, Sarah Parker 79 Ireland widow, Flora Graham 19 servant

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Rev. Alexander Langford was born in 1836 in Scotland He was received on trial in 1857

Charges:

1858  Belmont (Middlesex Cty), 1863-1864 Innisfil (Simcoe Cty), 1869 Louisville (Kent Cty), 1869-1881 Chatham (Kent Cty),  1891 Brampton (Peel Cty), 1896 Orangeville (Dufferin Cty), 1867-1869 Chairman Chatham, 1878 delegate  Montreal Conference

1871 Census
Langford, Alexander
Sex:Male
Age:35
Place of Birth:Scotland
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Kent
Sub-District Name:Chatham
Family: Wife  Permelia was born in 1842 in Ontario, Arthur 9, Mariah 7, Henry 4, Frederick 2, Leticha Dixon 21
1881 Census
Langford, Alexr
Sex:M
Age:45
Place of Birth:Scotland
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:Scotch
Occupation:Clergyman
Province:Ontario
District Name:Kent
Sub-District Name:Chatham
Family: Wife  Permelia was born in 1842 in Ontario, Arthur 18, Mariah 17, Henry 14, Frederick 12, William 10, Nellie 6, Sabrina Miller 27 England servant
1891 Census
Langford, Alexr
Sex:Male
Age:54
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Peel
Sub-District Name:Brampton
Family: Wife  Permelia was born in 1842 in Ontario, Arthur 29, Mariah 27, Henry 24, Frederick 21, William 19, Nellie 17,

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Rev. Robert Fowler M.D. was born in 1825 in England, was received on trial in 1854 in Oshawa at the Belleville Conference, Wesleyan Methodist

Baptisms:

CADE Charles Alfred son of John and Susan was born on July 1, 1865 in Sidney Twp., Hastings Cty., and was baptized on July 15, 1865 in Sidney by Rev. Robert Fowler

Charges:

1853 Nelson, 1854 Oshawa, 1855-1856 Markham, ordained in 1857 at Toronto East, 1858 Wolfe Island, 1858 Hamilton, 1859 Consecon, 1859 Brantford, 1860 Yonge Street South, 1861-1862 Keene/Otonabee (Peterborough Cty), 1863 Frankford (retired), 1864-1866 Sidney Twp., (Hastings Cty.), 1867-1869 Colborne, 1869 Cobourg, 1870-1872 Orillia (Simcoe Cty), 1873 Fergus (Wellington Cty.), 1874-1876 Ingersoll, 1877-1878 Clinton, 1879-1881 Listowel, Delegate to the First General Conference Toronto 1874, Delegate to the General Conference 1878

1871 Census
Fowler, Robert
Sex:Male
Age:48
Place of Birth:England
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Simcoe North
Sub-District Name:Orillia
Family:  Wife  Huldah was born in 1832 in Ontario, Mary 8, Joanna McKay 25 Scotland servant, Margaret Brown 22 Ontario teacher
1881 Census
Fowler, Robert
Sex:M
Age:58
Place of Birth:England
Ethnic Origin:English
Occupation:Minister
Province:Ontario
District Name:Perth North
Sub-District Name:Listowell
Family:  Wife  Huldah was born in 1832 in Ontario, Mary Louisa 18,  Joseph 9

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Rev. George McRitchie was was born in 1827 in Dundee, Scotland and was received on trial in 1850 in Georgetown and ordained in 1854

“He was born in Dundee, Scotland in 1827, which makes him at present, forty-seven (in 1874) Just twenty years after his birth, here in Canada, he became a Methodist, under the Ministrations of Rev. William Young.  Two years after he was licensed as an exhorter. In another year he was a local preacher, and within a few weeks after, sent by the Rev. John Ryerson to the Georgetown Circuit.”

“All the Scotch preachers we have had to portray are clever men; as a preacher this gentleman is one of the best. He does not promise a great deal now, to look at him; and he promised a great deal less when he commenced his career. But he has grown to be the thoughtful, original, and quickening preacher. He has got so much energy in delivery, gut there is much in the thoroughness in which he “bolts his subjects to the brain,” as the old de=ivine would say, which reminds usof the late Rev. Henry Wilkinson. Nor is he unlike him in appearance; he is perhaps a little taller, but his muscle is equally attenuated and hardened, and his complexion is equally as dark. We believe, also, he is equally as good a man, which is saying a great deal.”

Brother McRitchie gave promise of what he afterwards became, before his trial year was ended on the Georgetown Circuit. Part of his probation, was destined to enjoy the improving advantages of Victoria College.

…from Case, and His Cotemporaries

Charges:

1851 Georgetown, 1853 Bowmanville, 1854-1855 Kingston, 1856-1859 Lloydtown (York Cty), 1860 Burgess Twp. (Johnstown), 1864-1865 Ernestown, 1866-1869 Montreal South, 1871 Simcoe (Norfolk Cty), 1872 Windham, 1874 Elizabethtown (Leeds Cty), 1879-1881 Perth (Lanark Cty), 1885 Augusta (Leeds Cty), 1891 Ottawa

Baptisms:
ABBOTT  William Jamieson son of  Albert and  Elizabeth was born at  Elizabethtown  on August 11, 1874 and was baptized on November 17, 1874 at Elizabethtown by Rev. George McRitchie

1871 Census
McRitchie, George
Sex:Male
Age:43
Place of Birth:Scotland
Religion:Wesleyan Methodist
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Norfolk North
Sub-District Name:Simcoe
Family:  Wife Eliza was born in 1837 in Ontario
1881 Census
McRitchie, George
Sex:M
Age:53
Place of Birth:Scotland
Religion:Canada Methodist
Ethnic Origin:Scotch
Occupation:Preacher
Province:Ontario
District Name:Lanark South
Sub-District Name:Perth
Family: Wife Jane was born in 1847 in Ontario, Jessie 1
1891 Census
McRitchie, George
Sex:Male
Age:63
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Ottawa City
Sub-District Name:Wellington Ward
Family: Wife Jane was born in 1847 in Ontario, Jessie 11, Eva 9

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Colpoy's Bay Church

Colpoy’s Bay Church

COLPOY’S BAY, a post village on an inlet of Georgian Bay, with fine harbour and docks in Bruce County, Ontario, 23 miles from Owen Sound, and 3 miles from the village of Wiarton, on the G.T.R., 10 miles north of Park Head Jct. It contains 1 saw mill, 1 hotel, 1 Methodist church and 1 store. Pop. 300 ...from Lovell’s 1906 Canada Gazetteer

Colpoy’s Bay – A beautiful Bay washing the northernmost part of the County, and an arm of Georgian Bay, named after a pilot in the exploring expedition of Capt. W. F. W. Owen, R. N., at which time the shore of Georgian Bay was an uninhabited wilderness, with the solitary exception of Penetanguishene and immediate neighbourhood.

Colpoy’s Bay has the Township of Keppel on the South, the Township of Albemarle on the North and the Townplot of Wiarton at its Western end.

It opens out Northeasterly into the Lake, having White Cloud Island lying directly in its mouth. Further out, like the second cordon of
a blockading squadron, lie Griffeth’s Island and Hay Island; in such order that when within the Bay, the view of the open lake is entirely obstructed, and the shelter is complete.

The Bay is of great depth; nine miles long; from White Cloud Island to the head of the Bay, (Wiarton is as yet only a “Town” on paper), and has no shoals, sand-bars nor rocks to obstruct the navigation.

As the visitor enters the Bay both shores are guarded by a high precipitous ridge of rugged limestone a short distance back from the shore, that on the Northwest side being the highest and most irregular. These ridges lessen down toward the head of the Bay; in fact almost disappearing.

On the Southern shore, for two miles before reaching the head of the Bay a beautiful succession of improving farms is presented. This was formerly an Indian Reserve, but given up and sold some three years ago.
Here we find a Post Office lately established for the convenience of the settlers. “Oxenden P. O.” The mail from Owen Sound is carried across by boat to “Colpoy’s Bay.” P. O. directly opposite, 1 1/4 m. across), in the Township of Albemarle, and County of Bruce. In the latter vicinity are also some good farms.

Colpoy’s Bay is a favorite resort for summer picnic parties by Steamer, from Owen Sound. The two Post-offices above named are 30 miles from Owen Sound, by water. In former years all communication with Colpoy’s Bay was by coasting in boats. Lately the County line has been opened out, and Owen Sound is brought 10 miles nearer. From
Colpoy’s Bay across to Lake Huron is only 7 miles.

…from the Gazetteer and Directory of the County of Grey for 1865-66 by W. W. Smith, Owen Sound

As with most communities in their infancy, the pioneering residents of Colpoy’s Bay first held church services in their homes. One of the earliest residents, Reverend Ludwick Kribs led the services, occasionally from his own home, a log cabin on the shore of the bay later used as a workshop by Edwin and Fred Kalbfleisch

In 1863, Kribs donated a half acre of land and had a log structure erected for use as as a combined Congregationalist church, school and community hall. Located along the shore road roughly half way between the bottom of Spragge’s Hill and the village wharf, church services were held in the building until 1875, although they had become intermittent after Rev. Kribs moved away in 1870.

The year 1875 saw a dedicated church constructed just southwest of Krib’s log hall. The new frame church was built by John Wood (along with the hand-carved pulpit) and formally consecrated on October 15, 1876 as a Bible Christian Church. The classic wood-sided church with its high-pitched room and slender profile must have been a source of great pride for the village at the time. Although the denomination changed titles (Bible Christian was subsumed into the Methodist Church in 1884, which itself became part of the United Church in 1925), the building itself saw only minor additions over the years. A Sunday school was added to the rear of the structure in 1919 and electricity was added in the mid-1930s. Otherwise, the church remained virtually unchanged.

colpoyschurch_interiorsepia

In 1937, the Church was temporarily closed for interior renovations. Upon its opening on October 10th, a celebratory service was held, making front-page news in the Wiarton Echo newspaper. In fact, three of the attendees (Mrs. C. Cottrill, Mrs. Jon McIver and Mr. Caleb Brown) had been present at the opening of the church 61 years earlier.

Through the decades, the church served its community well. However, attendance slowly declined, in part due to competition from other churches (made more accessible by the automobile) and the growing share of summer residents in the village’s population. In 1968, the church was taken in as part of the Wiarton United Church pastoral charge, and services were only held during the summer. Even these became less frequent with time, however, to the point when the church was essentially closed except for special occations. The church garnered a large crowd for its 125th anniversary service in 2000, however, no services have been held since July of 2004. Not surprisingly, building maintenance suffered as usage declined. The paint began to peel on the exterior and interior of the church. Most notably, the Sunday school room fell into disrepair.

In 2007 it was revealed that the United Church would be seeking a buyer for the Colpoy’s Bay church property. The $75 000 cost for necessary structural repairs was simply too much for the United church to justify. Efforts were made to save the structure by offering it to the Grey County Museum Heritage Village, but the museum turned the offer down because the church did not come from Grey county.

The end came swiftly when the entire church structure was turned into a pile of rubble on December 6, 2007. On the positive side, a catalogue was made of the all the contents in the building before demolition and important items (e.g., the pulpit, pump organ, some pews, a list of local soldiers lost in World War 1) were preserved through acquisition by St. John’s United Church (Wiarton), the local veterans’ legion, the Bruce County Museum and local individuals. Figure 13D shows the demolition of Colpoys Bay United Church in progress.

Now, for the first time in over 130 years, the bright white facade of Colpoys Bay’s little community church will not cast a reflection in the calm morning waters of the bay. One of the village’s oldest buildings, erected by the hands of its first settlers, has been lost.

…from Postcards From the Bay

Ministers:

Wiarton/Cape Crocker/Colpoy’s Bay

1860 Rev. Mr. Dribbs

1864  Rev. William Bothwell  Methodist New Connexion

1864-1866 Rev. Edward Sallows Wesleyan Methodist

1873 Rev. William M. Bielby – Wiarton

1882-1884 Rev. Adam Glazier – Methodist New Connexion

1884 Rev. Solomon Chesley Edmonds – Wiarton

1890-1892 Rev. Samuel Edwards – Wiarton

1890-1892 Rev. George Buggin – Methodist New Connexion

1892-1898 Rev. Robert Carson

1898-1900 Rev. Thomas Cooling B.A. – Wiarton

Members:

1871 Census
Wood, John
Sex:Male
Age:52
Place of Birth:England
Religion:Church of England
Marital Status:Married
Province:Ontario
District Name:Bruce North
Sub-District Name:Albermarle, Eastnor

1880 Full record for Wood, John

Last Name Wood
First Name John
Nativity England
Business Proprietor of saw and grist mills
Year Settled 1857
Town Colpoy’s Bay
Township Albemarle
County Bruce
Atlas Date 1880

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JOHNSON, WILLIAM, businessman, civil servant, and Sunday school superintendent; born 28 Sept. 1842 in Antrim (Northern Ireland), eldest son of William Johnson, a merchant, and Mary Bennett; married 28 Nov. 1867 Mary Louise Jones Lyon in Belleville, Ont., and they had three sons and three daughters; died there 12 Oct. 1912.

William Johnson’s forebears had fought for William III in Ireland in 1689–90 and had been rewarded with land grants at Oldstone, near Antrim. With this heritage, it was natural for William, at 18, to join the Orange lodge in Belfast, where he had gone to complete his education. At age 21 he immigrated to Belleville, bringing with him letters of introduction to Mackenzie Bowell, publisher of the Intelligencer, an ardent Orangeman, and a fellow Methodist. Bowel] provided Johnson with accommodation and a newspaper job. As soon as he had arrived in Belleville he had joined the 15th Battalion Volunteer Militia Infantry, and he was active in resisting the Fenian raids in 1866. For three years Johnson lived in St Catharines, where he became a Sunday school superintendent, but he soon returned to Belleville. By 1871 he had opened a shop there selling hats, furs, and men’s clothing; within a few years he was joined in this business by his brother John Wesley.

Probably through Bowell’s influence as minister of customs, the federal government appointed Johnson a district inspector of weights and measures in 1879 and a gas inspector the following year; in 1895 he also became an inspector of electric lighting. Although he was faithful and efficient in this work till his death in 1912, his importance derives from his avocations.

A natural leader, Johnson rose through the ranks of the Orange Lodge to become provincial grand master for Ontario East in 1883–87. When the lodge obtained a federal charter in 1890, both Johnson and Bowell were among the incorporators. Four times Johnson represented the Canadian lodge at worldwide grand councils, in Londonderry (Northern Ireland), Edinburgh, Ottawa, and Toronto. His frequent speeches were given, his obituary in the Daily Intelligencer would note, with “a great deal of wit and yet earnestness and Celtic fire.” Even his commercial ability was turned to the lodge: by 1896 he had established a company that manufactured Orange regalia.

Greater fame came from Johnson’s role as superintendent of the Sunday school of Bridge Street Methodist Church in Belleville, and in the wider Christian education movement. Established in 1822, the Belleville Sunday school had grown under the energetic leadership of local merchant Billa Flint*, who had been a scholar at the first such school in the province, begun in Elizabethtown (Brockville) by the Reverend William Smart*.

By the time the Belleville congregation had moved to its new stone church on Bridge Street in 1865, Johnson was deeply involved. He succeeded to the superintendent’s role in 1874. The previous year a new series of Sunday school publications known as the International Lessons had appeared, produced jointly by Protestant denominations in England, the United States, and Canada. Johnson immediately employed these materials and other advanced ideas. He recruited and trained a team of loyal teachers, and set out to increase the number of scholars, with rewards for children who brought others. In 1880 Johnson persuaded reluctant trustees to remodel the large church basement on the Akron plan, named for its origin in a Methodist church in Akron, Ohio. By this plan, classrooms with folding doors were arranged in a semicircle radiating from a central podium. In this arrangement all could participate in the general session and then the doors could be closed for class lessons, with a minimum of movement.

The students were divided into departments by age. Adult Bible classes drew large numbers of men and women. A “Cradle Roll” department enrolled newborn infants and provided literature and support to parents. A “Home Department” ministered to the elderly and to those physically unable to attend church. “Sunday School for every member and every member in Sunday School” became more than a slogan. With a remarkable memory for names, Johnson greeted each of the scholars at the church door. Attendance grew rapidly in spite of the creation of five other Sunday schools from that at Bridge Street. Attendance averaged between 300 and 500, with membership peaking at 1,083 in 1897. Such participation, phenomenal in a town of fewer than 10,000 people, made Bridge Street the largest Sunday school in Canada.

Johnson gave leadership in the Sunday school movement not only in Belleville but also at the national and international levels. Elected president of the Sunday School Association of Canada in 1876, he further served the Methodist Church as a delegate between 1886 and 1902 to five quadrennial general conferences, where he sat on committees on statistics, Sunday schools, and youth work. In 1904 he was a delegate to the fourth World Sunday School Convention in Jerusalem. Johnson did not live to see his denomination enter church union in 1925, but he rejoiced at the 99 per cent yes vote of the Bridge Street congregation just seven months before his death in 1912. As recording steward for its board, he supervised the voting procedures.

In addition to his church work, Johnson served Belleville for 37 years as a member of its Board of Education, five of them as chairman (1882–86). His two brothers were more politically inclined: John, his one-time business partner and a principal of the Ontario Business College in Belleville, served terms as mayor and as an MLA; James was editor of two Conservative newspapers, the Kingston News and the Ottawa Citizen.

Although William Johnson was not a creator of new ideas, he effectively implemented those of others. While clinging to many conservative ideals, he was progressive in the field of Christian education and set clear goals, which he pursued ardently. He represents the crossover between those Christians who stressed conversion and those who focused on educating children in Christian values [see Henry Flesher Bland*]. He had been an eager supporter of evangelistic work among youth, and had espoused the four Belleville missions, in 1888, 1894, 1902, and 1908, of the Methodist evangelistic team of Hugh Thomas Crossley* and John Edwin Hunter. Johnson was an exceptional example of the thousands of volunteer leaders in many denominations who gave the Sunday school movement tremendous momentum, significantly influencing generations of youth and adults.

from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online by J. William Lamb

[In addition to receiving lengthy obituaries in the Daily Intelligencer (Belleville, Ont.), 14 Oct. 1912, and the Christian Guardian (Toronto), 4 Dec. 1912, William Johnson was featured in the Canadian Epworth Era (Toronto), January 1907. Details of his Irish background were obtained by the author from the Reverend Eric Gallagher of Lisburn, Northern Ireland. The fullest account of Johnson’s life appears in J. W. Lamb, Bridging the years: a history of Bridge Street United/Methodist Church, Belleville, 1815–1990 (Winfield, B.C., 1990).  j.w.l.]

AO, RG 22-340, no.4342; RG 80-27-2, 18: 159. NA, RG 31, C1, 1871, Belleville, div.1: 70 (mfm. at AO). Can., Parl., Sessional papers, 1896, no.16a; 1913, no.30. Cyclopædia of Canadian biog. (Rose and Charlesworth), vol.1. Directories, Belleville, 1877, 1896; Ont., 1871.

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Rev. Henry W. Maxwell was born in 1840 in Plympton, Lambton Cty and died on April 14th. 1871. At the time of his death was in charge of a church at Durham, Province of Quebec. He was received on trial in 1862 at Ainleyville. He had a brother Rev. William J. Maxwell who was a Wesleyan Methodist minister

Charges:

1863 Kincardine, 1864 Howick, 1865 student at Victoria College Cobourg, 1866 Eaton, 1867 Bathurst, 1868 Foxboro (Hastings Cty), 1869 Port Neuf, 1870-1871 Durham Quebec,

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